Monthly Archives: March 2013

Bring Environmentalists Down

Comment By Bob L.
03-29-2013

It is time to put Environmentalists in their place, if they want to destroy the United States and the World, then shut down all Refineries, (NO Gas, kerosene, Propane, Jet Fuel every one of these have a soot and sulphur content), Sulphur [A pale-yellow, brittle nonmetallic element that occurs widely in nature, especially in volcanic deposits, minerals, natural gas, and petroleum.] Power Plants, stop Wind Power, and Solar Power, and No weapons of any kind, because any thing that is made causes Pollution of some kind, if this is what they want then let’s go back to before there was any thing but candles, oooops that even causes pollution and soot. And they want you to use Natural gas in your vehicle, but not with Sulphur read the article.

To do this that means that you would have no houses unless you had only hand tools to cut down trees,oops you can not do that because that would cause pollution from fires so you could not even cook your food because that would cause pollution, so now you would have to live from roots, berries, and just think you would be the food of the wild animals, so if this is what they want then give it to them and lets see how long it would last.

No More Free Ride For Any One, every one will pay the price of what the Environmentalists, Special Interest, and Governments wants.

You can put any thing on paper, it might look good, but that does not mean it is true or fact.

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EPA taking aim at auto emissions, sulfur in gas

By DINA CAPPIELLO | Associated Press
03-29-2013

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reducing sulfur in gasoline and tightening emissions standards on cars beginning in 2017, as the Obama administration is proposing, would come with costs as well as rewards. The cost at the pump for cleaner air across the country could be less than a penny or as high as 9 cents a gallon, depending on who is providing the estimate.

An oil industry study says the proposed rule being unveiled Friday by the administration could increase gasoline prices by 6 cents to 9 cents a gallon. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates an increase of less than a penny and an additional $130 to the cost of a vehicle in 2025.

The EPA is quick to add that the change aimed at cleaning up gasoline and automobile emissions would yield billions of dollars in health benefits by 2030 by slashing smog- and soot-forming pollution. Still, the oil industry, Republicans and some Democrats have pressed the EPA to delay the rule, citing higher costs.

Environmentalists hailed the proposal as potentially the most significant in President Barack Obama’s second term.

The so-called Tier 3 standards would reduce sulfur in gasoline by more than 60 percent and reduce nitrogen oxides by 80 percent, by expanding across the country a standard already in place in California. For states, the regulation would make it easier to comply with health-based standards for the main ingredient in smog and soot. For automakers, the regulation allows them to sell the same autos in all 50 states.

The Obama administration already has moved to clean up motor vehicles by adopting rules that will double fuel efficiency and putting in place the first standards to reduce the pollution from cars and trucks blamed for global warming.

“We know of no other air pollution control strategy that can achieve such substantial, cost-effective and immediate emission reductions,” said Bill Becker, executive director of the National Association of Clean Air Agencies. Becker said the rule would reduce pollution equal to taking 33 million cars off the road.

But the head of American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, Charles Drevna, said in an interview Thursday that the refiners’ group was still unclear on the motives behind the agency’s regulation, since refining companies already have spent $10 billion to reduce sulfur by 90 percent. The additional cuts, while smaller, will cost just as much, Drevna said, and the energy needed for the additional refining actually could increase carbon pollution by 1 percent to 2 percent.

“I haven’t seen an EPA rule on fuels that has come out since 1995 that hasn’t said it would cost only a penny or two more,” Drevna said.

A study commissioned by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that lowering the sulfur in gasoline would add 6 cents to 9 cents a gallon to refiners’ manufacturing costs, an increase that likely would be passed on to consumers at the pump. The EPA estimate of less than 1 cent is also an additional manufacturing cost and likely to be passed on.

A senior administration official said Thursday that only 16 of 111 refineries would need to invest in major equipment to meet the new standards, which could be final by the end of this year. Of the remaining refineries, 29 already are meeting the standards because they are selling cleaner fuel in California or other countries, and 66 would have to make modifications.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the rule was still undergoing White House budget office review.

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Follow Dina Cappiello on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dinacappiello

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Good Example of Wasted Taxpayer money

Comment By Bob L.
03-20-2013

It seem that the taxpayer get stuck with every thing, from having to pay for Parks that are owned by the people of Washington State not the Government, these parks are Governments responsible to take care of, this is why we pay taxes so the State can take care of the people’s parks, but no they think they are theirs to do with what ever they want, like  privatizing them.

Now on the opposite side the taxpayers are paying for such things like Art Museums, Theaters of Performing arts who collect money for you to go see, I think it is time that these so-called non-profit organisations start paying their way and not the taxpayer, if they can pay them selves a wage then they can pay to maintain where the work and perform not the taxpayer, it is time for these Actors, Performers, Entertainers, and Symphony Orchestras start pony up their money, the Taxpayer should not be subsidizing for any one who charges a fee for service, this goes for Public or Private, it is just like any Private Citizen, or Company, they have to work to pay their bills to see that their homes or offices don’t fall down.

Government Agencies should not be in the Realestate Business Owning or Renting to private businesses or Organizations, because who gets stuck repairing these buildings, YOU the TAXPAYER, and just think what happens, THEY Raise Taxes to pay for the Maintenance. Put the money into school books for a better Education to get these kids an Education they need, and NOT into WAGES so no teacher will be left behind, that is not giving a good Education when wages for Teachers and Unions are more important than our Kids futures.

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Olympia council considers cost to repair Washington Center

By MATT BATCHELDOR | Staff writer
Published March 19, 2013

The Olympia City Council will consider tonight whether to spend $3.3 million to replace the leaky exterior of the Washington Center for the Performing Arts.

City Manager Steve Hall recommends the council choose the lowest bidder for the job, Corp Inc. Construction of Salem, Ore. The bid is 4 percent higher than an architect’s estimate.

All told, the city could spend about $4.6 million to renovate the building at 512 Washington St. SE, including replacing the roof and rooftop mechanical equipment.

Olympia owns the building and is in charge of major maintenance, while the nonprofit arts organization also known as the Washington Center runs the theater and is responsible for interior maintenance.

The city has been looking to stem the deterioration at the building since at least 2008, when the Public Works department found “widespread water intrusion was compromising the integrity of the building exterior,” according to a city staff report. Crews made emergency repairs designed to last five years.

A more detailed study found that the entire exterior, a synthetic stucco-like material called EIFS, needed to be removed and replaced.

Last June, the council recommended the most expensive of three repair options — including a new brick exterior, canopy with lighting, glass doors, a ticket window, poster display windows, custom windows and stone cladding above the canopy, a canopy over the adjacent alley and a permanent marquee sign.

At the time, the council decided it would drop some of the design elements, including the marquee and the stone cladding, if it didn’t receive an $816,000 state grant. The state has recommended the city receive the grant, but the State Legislature has to include it in its final budget.

But City Manager Steve Hall is now recommending the council go with those extras anyway. According to the staff report, the project needs to start before a decision on the grant is announced later this month or next month. The council will make the final decision of going with the extras or without, which would save $197,890.

The center’s roof and mechanical systems would be replaced at the same time, Sullivan said.

Sullivan said that part of the council’s decision tonight is how the city will pay for the repairs. Minus design expenses, which have already been paid, the city will owe $4.2 million. Council members will decide on whether to borrow the rest.

Debbie Sullivan, director of Technical Services, said the plan is to start construction in April and wrap by this fall. That way, the construction will avoid the bulk of the center’s seasonal entertainment.

“We’re going to do the bulk of the work during their off-season,” she said. Chad Carpenter, director of event services for the center, said the construction will impact 14 events, but construction will not occur during the shows. And no events have been cancelled as a result.

“The impact that it’s going to have… although it will be significant, I think it will be minor,” he said.

Matt Batcheldor: 360-704-6869 mbatcheldor@theolympian.com @MattBatcheldor

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GOP budget takes aim again at Obamacare, Medicaid

Comment By Bob L.
03-12-2013

546583_408007372566358_100000712963668_1248716_1809064828_nHere we go again, they talk about cutting Medicaid and making Seniors pay more for medicare, that would be nice if we made what they make, but seniors don’t, well some might, but the biggest percentage does not.

They talk about entitlements, well lets start with theirs, like their Medical, Free Transportation, the Presidential PLANES, better yet let’s make the President pay for all his and his wife’s transportation every where they go, out of their pocket they can afford it, just like the rest of them there in DC,  that would save a lot of  money that they want to cut, start there with every thing that come with their job and their pay, there is not one of them that needs that much money, just think most of them are worth over a million $$$$$.

These Government Agencies are only thinking about one group of people, the RICH YUPPIES who are spending all the money that is keeping this Country Broke, so when it come to CUTS, START WITH ALL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES, Federal, State, Counties, and Cities, TOP TO THE BOTTOM, that is where you start all cuts.

They say they are not going to give them selves a pay raise until they have a budget, well in that budget they better show that they are not going to get any more raises, as it is now they are all over paid, really they are supposed to be there for America, not themselves.

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GOP budget takes aim again at Obamacare, Medicaid

By ANDREW TAYLOR | Associated Press
03-12-2013

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans unveiled their latest budget outline on Tuesday, sticking to their plans to try to repeal so-called Obamacare, cut domestic programs ranging from Medicaid to college grants and require future Medicare patients to bear more of the program’s cost.

The point is to prove it’s possible to balance the budget within 10 years by simply cutting spending and avoiding further tax hikes, even though the fiscal blueprint released Tuesday by Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., will be dead on arrival with the White House and Democrats controlling the Senate.

The latest Ryan plan generally resembles prior ones, relying on higher tax revenues enacted in January and improved Medicare cost estimates — along with somewhat sharper spending cuts — to promise balance.

Senate Democrats plan to offer a counterproposal on Wednesday with higher spending on domestic programs and additional tax hikes on top of the higher rates imposed on top-bracket earners in January. That plan will, in turn, arrive as a dead letter in the GOP-controlled House.

At issue on Tuesday and beyond is the arcane and partisan congressional budget process, one that is unlikely to illustrate a path forward in a gridlocked Washington. At stake are so-called budget resolutions, which are nonbinding measures that have the potential to stake out parameters for follow-up legislation cutting spending and rewriting the complex U.S. tax code.

But this year’s dueling GOP and Democratic budget proposals are more about defining political differences — as if last year’s elections didn’t do enough of that — than charting a path forward toward a solution. Congressional budgets often simply state party positions, and invariably are partisan endeavors.

The partisan exercise comes even as President Barack Obama travels to Capitol Hill later on Tuesday to meet with Senate Democrats in an attempt to resuscitate his failed efforts for bipartisanship.

Ryan, who became a national GOP figure as the losing vice presidential nominee last year, has for now settled back into his wonkish role as Budget Committee chairman and chief tutor for dozens of relatively junior Republicans. He’s also armed with a full battery of budget bromides.

“We’re introducing a budget that balances in 10 years — without raising taxes,” Ryan said in an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal. “How do we do it? We stop spending money the government doesn’t have.” All told, Ryan’s plan would slash $4.6 trillion in spending over the coming decade.

“On the current path, we’ll spend $46 trillion over the next 10 years. Under our proposal, we’ll spend $41 trillion,” Ryan said. “On the current path, spending will increase by 5 percent each year. Under our proposal, it will increase by 3.4 percent.”

Ryan’s plan promises to cut the deficit from $845 billion this year to $528 billion in the 2014 budget year that starts in October. It would drop to $125 billion in 2015 and hover pretty much near balance for several years before registering a $7 billion surplus in 2023.

The House Budget Committee has scheduled a vote on the measure Wednesday, and the Senate Budget panel is slated to vote Thursday on rival legislation by new Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray, D-Wash., who promises new tax revenues but few cuts from domestic programs like Medicare and Medicaid.

“We are working towards fair and balanced, which is what the American public has said time and time again that they want,” Murray said. “We need to make sure that everybody participates in getting us to a budget that deals with our debt and our deficit responsibly.”

For his part, Ryan has resurrected a controversial Medicare proposal that replaces traditional Medicare for those currently under 55 with a government subsidy to buy health insurance on the open market. Critics of the plan say the subsidies won’t grow with inflation fast enough and would shove thousands of dollars in higher premiums onto seniors before very long.

The House GOP plan again proposes sharp cuts to the Medicaid health program for the poor, tighter food stamp eligibility rules and claims $1.8 trillion in savings over a decade by repealing Obama’s signature overhaul of the U.S. health care system. It generally seeks to preserve the Pentagon budget, but only at the expense of proposing dramatic cuts to domestic agency budgets that may prove too low for GOP moderates and the pragmatists atop the Appropriations Committee responsible for guiding them into law.

A document released Tuesday offers few specifics on the proposed cuts to domestic programs, but it generally appears to incorporate spending levels for day-to-day agency operations significantly below levels called for by controversial automatic spending cuts. They are just starting to take effect though their bite has yet to cause broad-based pain.

Even as it proposes repealing Obamacare, the Ryan plan preserves more than $700 billion in the health care law’s cuts to Medicare providers over a decade — just as more than $600 billion in tax hikes on the wealthy enacted in January make it easier for Ryan’s budget to predict balance.

Ryan also proposes overhauling the tax code by eliminating many or most tax deductions and using the savings to lower income tax rates, with a top rate of 25 percent instead of 39.6 percent.

As the two side battle over future-year budgets, top Senate Democrats and Republicans late Monday released a catchall government funding bill for the ongoing fiscal year that denies Obama new money for implementing signature first-term accomplishments like new regulations on Wall Street and his expansion of government health care subsidies, but provides modest additional funding for domestic priorities like health research and highway projects.

Monday’s measure was the product of bipartisan negotiations and is the legislative vehicle to fund the day-to-day operations of government through Sept. 30 — and prevent a government shutdown when current funding runs out March 27.

It sets a path for government after across-the-board spending cuts that took effect March 1. In most cases the minor changes in agency budgets amount to housekeeping within a trillion-dollar cap for the day-to-day operations of agencies in the current budget year.

Passage in the Senate this week seems routine and could presage an end to a mostly overlooked battle between House Republicans and Obama and his Senate Democratic allies over the annual spending bills required to fund federal agency operations.

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Do Not Toot Your Whistle, Democrats are not Through Yet

Comments By Bob L.
03-09-2013

Just because things might look a little better, don’t get excited, Obama and his pen are not through yet.

Obama still has three and three forth (3 and 3/4) years to screw things up, just look what happen the first four years, so don’t get to excited, there are still a lot of people out of work and have no prospects of finding work.

If you remember, Obama has said hire College and Military, and where does that leave the rest who are unemployed, and they say they don’t discriminate, they do it every day to all American Citizens, just some are more privileged than others.

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Politicians look for credit in a rising economy

By JIM KUHNHENN | Associated Press
03-09-2013

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increased hiring, lower unemployment, stock market on the rise. Who gets the credit?

It’s a hotly debated point in Washington, where political scorekeeping amounts to who gets blame and who gets praise.

Following Friday’s strong jobs report — 236,000 new jobs and unemployment dropping to a four-year low of 7.7 percent — partisans hurriedly staked out turf.

“Woot woot!” tweeted former White House economic adviser Austan Goolsbee. “With 12 million still unemployed?” countered Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell’s spokesman, Don Stewart.

Presidents usually get the rap for economic downturns and reap benefits when things improve. But the main factors affecting the current recovery and the record activity in the stock market may have less to do with high-profile fiscal policy fights in Washington than they do in the decisions of the Federal Reserve Bank, which has pumped trillions of dollars into the economy, kept interests rates at near zero and pushed investors away from low-yield bonds to stocks.

“From a policy standpoint, this is being driven primarily by the Fed,” said Mark Vitner, an economist at Wells Fargo.

Yet to some, Washington deserves little recognition.

“Economies recover,” said Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a former director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office and now head of the American Action Forum, a conservative public policy institute. He acknowledged the Fed’s monetary policies halted the initial free fall by the financial industry, but he said the economy has had to catch up to the Fed’s low interest rates.

“It took a long time for the housing market for them to matter and for the auto market for them to matter,” Holtz-Eakin said. “So I don’t think that’s a policy victory.”

If Democrats are eager to give President Barack Obama acclaim for spurring the recovery with an infusion of spending in 2009, there are just as many Republicans who will claim his health care law and his regulatory regimes slowed it.

If there is common ground among economists, it is that the next step in fiscal policy should be focused on reining in long-term spending on entitlements programs, particularly Medicare, instead of continuing debates over short-term spending. But such a grand bargain has been elusive, caught in a fight over Obama’s desire for more tax revenue and Republican opposition to more tax increases.

Obama and some Republicans are trying to move the process with phone calls and a dinner here and a luncheon there. Next week, the president plans to address Democrats and Republicans in the House and Senate in separate meetings to see, as he put it Saturday in his weekly radio and Internet address, “if we can untangle some of the gridlock.”

Who gets credit does have political consequences. A strong economy would create more space for Obama to pursue other aspects of his second-term agenda. But it’s an important question for the long term, too, because if the recovery is indeed accelerating it could validate the policies that the Obama administration and the Fed put in place.

Hiring has been boosted by high corporate profits and by strength in the housing, auto, manufacturing and construction sectors. Corporate profits are up. Still, it might be too soon to declare victory. While the recovery may be getting traction, the U.S. economy is not yet strong.

Economic growth is forecast to be a modest 2 percent this year. Unemployment, even as it drops, remains high nearly four years after the end of the Great Recession, with roughly 12 million people out of work.

Last year’s early months also showed strong job gains only to see them fade by June.

March could prove to be a more telling indicator as the economy responds to a third month of higher Social Security taxes and as across-the-board spending cuts that kicked in March 1 begin to work their way through government programs. Economists say anticipation of the cuts already caused a downturn in the fourth quarter of last year as the defense industry slowed spending. The Congressional Budget Office and some private forecasters say the coming cuts could reduce economic growth by about half a percentage point and cost about 700,000 jobs by the end of 2014.

“My view is that aggressive monetary and fiscal policy response to the recovery has been a net positive,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

But referring to the automatic cuts, he said, “Fiscal policies have turned from a very powerful tailwind to a pretty significant head wind.” And, he added, “the economy is going to be tested again in the next few months.”

Obama has been distancing himself from the potential consequences of the automatic cuts, even though he signed the legislation that put them in place. Initially, they were designed to be so onerous that it would force all sides to work out a long-term deficit-reduction and debt-stabilization package. But that agreement never materialized.

If the recovery has been slow, White House officials argue, it is because Republicans have been unwilling to yield to Obama’s demands for deficit reduction that combines tax increases and cuts in spending.

Obama himself seemed to touch on that viewpoint in his weekly address.

“At a time when our businesses are gaining a little more traction, the last thing we should do is allow Washington politics to get in the way,” he said while heralding good economic news. “You deserve better than the same political gridlock and refusal to compromise that has too often passed for serious debate over the last few years.”

Vitner, the Wells Fargo economist, argues that if anyone deserves credit for the recovery, it is the American public and American businesses “for being able to tune out all the noise that’s coming from Washington.”

“It’s remarkable,” he said, “that in the face of so much political uncertainty we’ve been able to see the growth that we have.”

Categories: America, Democrats, Education, government, Jobs, Lives, money, Obama, people, Profiling, taxes, unemployed, White House | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

It Really Shows Where Stupid Is Not Smart

Comment By Bob L.
03-05-2013

This is what happens when you run off half cocked and pass a law without knowing what the outcome will be, JUST LIKE OUR GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, they don’t care, just as long as they get their name in the paper that they showed how stupid they are.

They don’t care how many people they put out of work just as long as they get their way and prove just how stupid they can get, instead of getting this Country back on its feet they would rather tare it down and show people that they went to College and what they have learned.

Look around you and see what college has brought to this Country, GREED and Snobs who want every one to bow to them and what they say.

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Store owners say plastic bag ban causes more shoplifting

By CASEY MCNERTHNEY, SEATTLEPI.COM STAFF
Thursday, February 28, 2013

When the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a ban on plastic bags and required businesses to charge a nickel for paper bags, city leaders believed it would be better all around.

“I think we’ve gotten to a place where it’s really going to work for the environment, businesses and the community in general,” Councilman Mike O’Brien said at the time.

But the bag ban is contributing to thousands of dollars in losses for at least one Seattle grocery store, and questions have been raised about the risk of food-borne illness from reusable bags that shoppers don’t often wash.

Mike Duke, who operates the Lake City Grocery Outlet with his wife, said that since the plastic-bag ban started last July, he’s lost at least $5,000 in produce and between $3,000 and $4,000 in frozen food.

“We’ve never lost that much before,” said Duke, who found those numbers through inventories of stolen and damaged goods.

The Dukes opened the Lake City grocery store in June 2011, and Mike Duke said in the year before the plastic-bag ban losses in frozen food and produce were a small fraction of what he’s seeing now. As he explained to seattlepi.com and also the North Seattle Chamber of Commerce, the shoplifters’ patterns are difficult to detect.

They enter the store with reusable bags and can more easily conceal items they steal. The reusable bags require staff to watch much more closely, and even though the store has a loss-prevention officer and more than a dozen security cameras, it’s tough to tell what a customer has paid for and what they may already have brought with them.

According to data released in January by Seattle Public Utilities, 21.1 percent of business owners surveyed said increased shoplifting because of the plastic bag ban was a problem. Results of another survey released in January – one done by an environmental advocacy group that found the ban “popular and successful” – didn’t mention the problem of shoplifting.

Seattle’s push for reusable bags – and shoplifters who have plagued several Lake City businesses – leave the Dukes in a predicament. Asking customers to check reusable bags at the counter would be burdensome to customers and staff, and prohibiting reusable bags and backpacks likely wouldn’t work well in Seattle, which other business owners said is known for grand environmental ideas that can hinder small business efforts.

The Lake City Grocery Outlet also saw a dramatic increase in the number of hand baskets stolen after Seattle’s plastic bag ban was initiated.

Shoplifters would fill up their baskets – some with purchased items and others with stolen groceries – and walk out of the store at 3020 N.E. 127th St. Duke would see the hand baskets discarded around Lake City and said the losses from the baskets and merchandise are in the thousands of dollars.

So last fall, the store did away with the remaining hand baskets to try and curb theft. But that frustrated some customers, and hasn’t substantially stopped losses.

San Francisco was the first major U.S. city to ban plastic grocery bags in 2007. Multiple research papers have said there are negative repercussions to public health, though supporters question or discount the findings. One study released late last summer cited emergency room treatment data and said after the bag ban began there was a spike in the number of E. coli cases and an increase of deaths from foodborne illnesses.

Another paper from 2011 found E. coli in 8 percent of all reusable bags from randomly selected individuals at California and Arizona grocery stores. Washing the bags eliminated 99.9 percent of the pathogens, according to that study – though it raised questions of how often shoppers actually do.

King County hasn’t had a public or private study on bacteria in reusable grocery bags.

But “it’s not surprising that bags are going to collect germs over time,” public health spokesman James Apa said. “People need to take common sense steps to protect themselves: wash their hands and wash their bags from time to time.”

Duke started in the grocery business at age 16 and has worked for several stores, including Safeway, Albertson’s and Fred Meyer before operating the Lake City Grocery Outlet. Neighbors and staff have praised the dedicated work from Duke and his wife, Patty, and say they’re concerned for them if the neighborhood theft trend continues.

The latest rash of produce and frozen food theft comes in a neighborhood that many say is overwhelmed by problems brought by homeless and low-income people.

Both police and other business owners say transients are a huge part of the theft problem, though several Lake City business owners won’t say that on the record for fear of being labeled as anti-homeless.

Members of the North Seattle Chamber of Commerce were told that theft at the Lake City Fred Meyer was the worst of any store in the Fred Meyer chain, which has more than 50 stores in Washington and Oregon. In an e-mail Thursday afternoon, Fred Meyer Public Affairs Director Melinda Merrill said in an e-mail the location is a “high-theft rate store, but all inner-city stores are, and Lake City is not our highest.”

Asked which Fred Meyer store has the highest theft and how the Lake City Fred Meyer compares to Washington stores, Merrill did not immediately respond.

“The Chamber is not anti-homeless; Lake City is not anti homeless,” North Seattle Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Diane Haugen said. “The question is the extent to which the hosting agencies follow up with the people they’re bringing here.”

Casey McNerthney can be reached at 206-448-8220 or at caseymcnerthney@seattlepi.com. Follow Casey on Twitter at twitter.com/mcnerthney.

Categories: America, Democrats, government, GREED, Jobs, money, Obama, people, politics, Republicans, Safety, White House, YUPPIES | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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